Stephen Paddock Vegas ShootingVideo

Stephen Paddock killed 58 people, wounding 500 concertgoers and may have had some help planning the attack at the country music festival Sunday night Wednesday night. The gunman in the Las Vegas massacre planned to escape after targeting the country music concert, but instead left behind a note and killed himself, authorities say.

Paddock, 64, had set up cameras inside and outside his hotel suite, and in the peep hole. Police also found 50 pounds of explosives and 1,600 rounds of ammunition in his car in the Mandalay Bay hotel parking lot. There was also a note in his hotel room, but it was not a suicide note.

Investigators believe something may have happened to Paddock between October last year and September this year that compelled him to purchase more weapons and ultimately lead to the massacre. Paddock bought 33 firearms, mostly rifles, during that 13-month period.

The arsenal of weapons in his hotel suite included bump-fire stocks — legal devices that enable a shooter to fire bullets rapidly, similar to an automatic rifle.

The first call reporting shots fired came at 10:08 p.m. Sunday, and the gunfire didn’t stop until 10:19 p.m., Clark County Undersheriff Kevin McMahill said. The shooting continued off and on for nine to 11 minutes, he said.

Paddock wired $100,000 to the Philippines, a law enforcement source said, but officials haven’t determined when the money transfer took place or who was the recipient.

The FBI is going through Paddock’s communications, financial records, associates and video surveillance to try to piece together the puzzle of his motive. Paddock is twice divorced, liked to gamble, and previously worked at the US Post Office and the IRS. He had no significant criminal history and was until then unknown to police.

FBI special agent Aaron Rouse said they have not found any evidence to indicate terrorism, but the investigation is ongoing.